Home > Security > Actionable Intelligence: The Mouse That Squeaked

Actionable Intelligence: The Mouse That Squeaked

[Obligatory disclosures -- I've consulted for Microsoft, and had been doing some research on Mouse events myself.]

So one of the more important aspects of security reporting is what I’ve been calling Actionable Intelligence. Specifically, when discussing a bug — and there are many, far more than are ever discovered let alone disclosed — we have to ask:

What can an attacker do today, that he couldn’t do yesterday, for what class attacker, to what class victim?

Spider.IO, a fraud analytics company, recently disclosed that under Internet Explorer attackers can capture mouse movement events from outside an open window. What is the Actionable Intelligence here? It’s moderately tempting to reply: We have a profound new source of modern art.

psmap
(Credit: Anatoly Zenkov’s IOGraph tool)

I exaggerate, but not much. The simple truth is that there are simply not many situations where mouse movements are security sensitive. Keyboard events, of course, would be a different story — but mouse? As more than a few people have noted, they’d be more than happy to publish their full movement history for the past few years.

It is interesting to discuss the case of the “virtual keyboard”. There has been a movement (thankfully rare) to force credential input via mouse instead of keyboard, to stymie keyloggers. This presupposes a class of attacker that has access to keyboard events, but not mouse movements or screen content. No such class actually exists; the technique was never protecting much of anything in the first place. It’s just pain-in-the-butt-as-a-feature.  More precisely, it’s another example of Rick Wash’s profoundly interesting turn of phrase, Folk Security. Put simply, there is a belief that if something is hard for a legitimate user, it’s even harder for the hacker. Karmic security is (unfortunately) not a property of the universe.

(What about the attacker with an inline keylogger? Not only does he have physical access, he’s not actually constrained to just emulating a keyboard. He’s on the USB bus, he has many more interesting devices to spoof.)

That’s not to say spider.io has not found a bug. Mouse events should only come from the web frame for which script has dominion over, in much the same way CNN should not be receiving Image Load events from a tab open to Yahoo. But the story of the last decade is that bugs are not actually rare, and that from time to time issues will be found in everything. We don’t need to have an outright panic when a small leak is found. The truth is, every remote code execution vulnerability can also capture full screen mouse motion. Every universal cross site scripting attack (in which CNN can inject code into a frame owned by Yahoo) can do similar, though perhaps only against other browser windows.

I would like to live in a world where this sort of very limited overextension of the web security model warrants a strong reaction. It is in fact nice that we do live in a world where browsers effectively expose the most nuanced and well developed (if by fire) security model in all of software. Where else is even the proper scope of mouse events even a comprehensible discussion?

(Note that it’s a meaningless concept to say that mouse events within the frame shouldn’t be capturable. Being able to “hover” on items is a core user interface element, particularly for the highly dynamic UI’s that Canvas and WebGL enable. The depth of damage one would have to inflict on the browser usability model, to ‘secure’ activity in what’s actually the legitimate realm of a page, would be profound. When suggesting defenses, one must consider whether the changes required to make them reparable under actual assault ruins the thing being defended in the first place. We can’t go off destroying villages in order to save them.)

So, in summary: Sure, there’s a bug here with these mouse events. I expect it will be fixed, like tens of thousands of others. But it’s not particularly significant.  What can an attacker do today, that he couldn’t do yesterday?  Not much, to not many.  Spider.io’s up to interesting stuff, but not really this.

Categories: Security
  1. December 14, 2012 at 9:46 pm

    Now that the out of the browser mouse tracking is known will IE start supporting WebGL? The security concerns microsoft raised with WebGL likely will not enable any new attack vectors already available.

    • December 14, 2012 at 9:52 pm

      It’ll probably get closed, as it should. As for WebGL, MS is completely right that WebGL is a security challenge the likes the browser has never faced. It absolutely enables attack vectors, the fixing of which is ludicrously complex as it’s smeared across a pile of companies.

      Doesn’t matter, though. The experience is so bracingly compelling that it’s still going to happen.

  2. December 17, 2012 at 4:53 am

    Reblogged this on lava kafle kathmandu nepal.

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